One of the toughest parts of ageing is losing your friends. At first it starts quietly, then pretty soon it’s every month, and you can’t help but think, ‘When is that bell going to go off for me?’ And on top of that you feel this constant loss. At this time of life, you feel just a sword’s point from death. It’s frightening – who wants to face God and the clear white light? I know I definitely don’t. Yet.
Jack Nicholson, reflecting on the death of his friend Dennis Hopper and his own mortality (source). (via rowthree)
I hate it. I don’t want to be treated like the Medusa or the Lincoln Memorial. People have an idea of me which is not the reality. On set I’m an actor like every other actor. Most times, for every part I play, I can think of other actors who would be better. I worry from the moment I take a job. I worry about how I’m going to do it, if I can do it. I try to work out what I have to do on set and how I do that. I get extremely anxious. I panic. I can’t get it. It happens every time, and I get myself into this state, and then I walk on set and the director says, ‘Roll’, and all of a sudden all of it disappears and it’s all happening, and I relax and I’m doing what I do and I’m not even thinking about it. And I relax up until the moment they yell ‘Cut.’
Jack Nicholson on acting and being a “movie star” (source). (via rowthree)
rowthree:

Look, I get it. Your days are busy enough as it is. You have 732 bookmarks, the most of which will forever be lost in the abyss that is you favorites folder. How could you possibly add another film website onto your must-read list of internet websites?
Well, I’m here to convince you to come over to our official Row Three website and give it a chance.
In the third row, our slogan is that it’s a place where armchair directors can find comfort. That means if you like movies for more than the sake of entertainment, then you’re bound to enjoy our site where we discuss films in-depth and encourage discussion.
All of our editors not only write articles, but every single one of us participates in the discussions beneath each. Ask us a question? It doesn’t get lost in the abyss of comments. As a rule, we always engage with our readers, which we find to be the most important and intellectually stimulating part of our site. Not feeling up to a debate? We accept cheesy gifs as comments also.

Reasons to join in on the third row action:
We have a truly unique and international group of writers from the all over the United States (Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh), Canada (Toronto, Vancouver), and the UK (Lincoln, Glasgow)!
We produce numerous podcasts that are very unique from one another (The Cinecast, Mamo!, and After the Credits). 
We have a massive review archive dating back to 2007!
The are active sections for Row Three readers to discuss television, music, books, and games! 
Our writers cover in-depth the widest variety of festivals in the movie blog sphere, festivals all over the world which include Cannes, Toronto International Film Festival, LA Film Festival, AFI Fest, Flyaway, Hot Docs, Toronto After Dark, Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, Shinsedai Festival, TCM Film Fest, Vancouver International Film Festival, Spark Animation Festival, and Fantasia!
David occasionally has a weekend where he watches and reviews terrible, awful, old B-movies (see: Weekend of Trash).
We are just a whole lot of fun!
So, come join us in the third row! You won’t be disappointed. Here is where you can find us:
Our official site: http://www.rowthree.com
About Our Writers
Our twitter account: @rowthree
Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rowthree
Our iTunes podcasts page: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/row-three-podcast/id269530318
Our various RSS feeds

rowthree:

Look, I get it. Your days are busy enough as it is. You have 732 bookmarks, the most of which will forever be lost in the abyss that is you favorites folder. How could you possibly add another film website onto your must-read list of internet websites?

Well, I’m here to convince you to come over to our official Row Three website and give it a chance.

In the third row, our slogan is that it’s a place where armchair directors can find comfort. That means if you like movies for more than the sake of entertainment, then you’re bound to enjoy our site where we discuss films in-depth and encourage discussion.

All of our editors not only write articles, but every single one of us participates in the discussions beneath each. Ask us a question? It doesn’t get lost in the abyss of comments. As a rule, we always engage with our readers, which we find to be the most important and intellectually stimulating part of our site. Not feeling up to a debate? We accept cheesy gifs as comments also.

Reasons to join in on the third row action:

So, come join us in the third row! You won’t be disappointed. Here is where you can find us:

You’re getting older, and you’ll see that life isn’t like your fairytales. The world is a cruel place. And you’ll learn that, even if it hurts.
Pan’s Labyrinth. (via elsske)
rowthree:

John Cazale, while his filmography is short, is a legend. Just look at the films he was in. Unfortunately, at the age of 41, he was diagnosed with terminal cancer shortly before The Deer Hunter was the begin filming in 1978. The studio didn’t want to take the risk and insure him, so De Niro secretly fronted the money needed to secure Cazale. Director Michael Cimino rearranged filming so Cazale and Meryl Streep, John’s romantic partner, were able to film all of their scenes first. 
John finished filming his scenes, but died before the film was compete with Meryl by his side the entire time.
Filmography
The Godfather  
The Conversation
The Godfather Part II 
Dog Day Afternoon 
The Deer Hunter
The five movies that he was in received a total of 40 Oscar nominations.
Here is a great clip from a documentary about John Cazale, with Pacino, Streep, and others talking about his legacy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DioCeSSkMVI

rowthree:

John Cazale, while his filmography is short, is a legend. Just look at the films he was in. Unfortunately, at the age of 41, he was diagnosed with terminal cancer shortly before The Deer Hunter was the begin filming in 1978. The studio didn’t want to take the risk and insure him, so De Niro secretly fronted the money needed to secure Cazale. Director Michael Cimino rearranged filming so Cazale and Meryl Streep, John’s romantic partner, were able to film all of their scenes first. 

John finished filming his scenes, but died before the film was compete with Meryl by his side the entire time.

  • Filmography
  • The Godfather
  • The Conversation
  • The Godfather Part II
  • Dog Day Afternoon
  • The Deer Hunter
The five movies that he was in received a total of 40 Oscar nominations.

Here is a great clip from a documentary about John Cazale, with Pacino, Streep, and others talking about his legacy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DioCeSSkMVI

You know what drives me crazy? It’s all these people talking about how great technology is, and how it saves all this time. But, what good is saved time, if nobody uses it? If it just turns into more busy work. You never hear somebody say, ‘With the time I’ve saved by using my word processor, I’m gonna go to a Zen monastery and hang out.’ I mean, you never hear that.
Jesse in Before Sunrise (1995)
I was having this awful nightmare that I was 32. And then I woke up and I was 23. So relieved. And then I woke up for real, and I was 32.
Celine in Before Sunset (2004)
I can’t understand this obsession with new things. Everyone’s looking for the new book but they forget that there’s so much material that’s being ignored. You know, they’ll decide — like Cormac McCarthy, they’ll make All the Pretty Horses and it didn’t work, so, OK, “Cormac McCarthy doesn’t work!” And then they make No Country for Old Men, and it’s like, “Cormac McCarthy works! Let’s make Cormac McCarthy movies!” That’s the way that people tend to think there. People try to make hits. And I don’t think about that.
Andrew Dominik (director of Killing Them Softly) in an interview with Grantland on the Hollywood mentality. Dominik has been trying to get an adaption of McCarthy’s Cities of the Plain financed for years now. (via rowthree)
rowthree:

Click the above photo to check out the first edition of Beer and a Movie.

rowthree:

Click the above photo to check out the first edition of Beer and a Movie.

The problem is that cinema, as I define it and as something that inspired me, is under assault by the studios and, from what I can tell, with the full support of the audience.
Director Steven Soderbergh’s Address on the State of Cinema (via rowthree)
rowthree:

Our exclusive poster for Working Girls, the upcoming sequel to the 1988 classic Working Girl, starring Harrison Ford reprising his role as the now-retired Jack Trainer who comes out of retirement to help his two daughters (played by Miley Cyrus and Megan Fox) run their new clothing line.

rowthree:

Our exclusive poster for Working Girlsthe upcoming sequel to the 1988 classic Working Girl, starring Harrison Ford reprising his role as the now-retired Jack Trainer who comes out of retirement to help his two daughters (played by Miley Cyrus and Megan Fox) run their new clothing line.

I always feel this pressure of being a strong and independent icon of womanhood, and without making it look my whole life is revolving around some guy. But loving someone, and being loved means so much to me. We always make fun of it and stuff. But isn’t everything we do in life a way to be loved a little more?
Celine in Before Sunrise (1995)
Cinecast Episode 341 – The Pleasure Port (click above)

Cinecast Episode 341 – The Pleasure Port (click above)