Cinecast Episode 341 – The Pleasure Port (click above)

Cinecast Episode 341 – The Pleasure Port (click above)

rowthree:

Look, I get it. Your days are busy enough as it is. You have 732 bookmarks, the most of which will forever be lost in the abyss that is you favorites folder. How could you possibly add another film website onto your must-read list of internet websites?
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rowthree:

Look, I get it. Your days are busy enough as it is. You have 732 bookmarks, the most of which will forever be lost in the abyss that is you favorites folder. How could you possibly add another film website onto your must-read list of internet websites?

Well, I’m here to convince you to come over to our official Row Three website and give it a chance.

In the third row, our slogan is that it’s a place where armchair directors can find comfort. That means if you like movies for more than the sake of entertainment, then you’re bound to enjoy our site where we discuss films in-depth and encourage discussion.

All of our editors not only write articles, but every single one of us participates in the discussions beneath each. Ask us a question? It doesn’t get lost in the abyss of comments. As a rule, we always engage with our readers, which we find to be the most important and intellectually stimulating part of our site. Not feeling up to a debate? We accept cheesy gifs as comments also.

Reasons to join in on the third row action:

So, come join us in the third row! You won’t be disappointed. Here is where you can find us:

Bad design causes stress and discomfort; whether it is typography in a document, or unfettered suburban sprawl or too many buttons on a mobile phone. Life and relationships, which invariably happen in a haphazard fashion by their nature are bad design, and even the happiest of marriages, or most well adjusted of families and such are nevertheless full of tensions and misunderstandings, but virtue of design being non-controlled, that we learn to live with and accept, or we move on. Storytelling, autobiography, blogging and other personal narratives are an attempt to put some good design on something as chaotic as ‘a life.’ Technology, from ink and paper, to the printing press and eventually the internet have enabled our capacity to do this on an individual level. The landscape of modern social media platforms and the specialized subset of dating websites, while far (very far) from perfect, are a significant step to projecting some ‘design’ onto how we present ourselves to the world. Ultimately, though we have to find a way to be comfortable in our own skin and headspace, while alone in a room, and this includes whether or not another person or persons are present. Comfort and confidence can be driven by good design, but finding some truth and understanding in the messiness is essential.

woman looks anxiously out of the frame. She is played by Bérénice Bejo the expressive ingenue from The Artist, but here she is a little, well a lot, more weary. We are in a busy airport in Paris, and a man is walking through the crowd. Their eyes meet. There is emotion from both parties expressed in body language, more layered than simple the happiness of greeting someone who just got off a plane. They converse, in a fashion, between through the thick glass that separates them. Ahmad is her husband returning from Tehran only to sign divorce papers so that his soon to be ex, Marie, can marry her current live in boyfriend. Marie has two kids from a previous marriage, and her new man has a child, although she has no children with Ahmed. Everyone lives under the same roof of a small home, which metaphorically is under a number of half-finished renovations; a new man means new light fixtures. Bringing Ahmed into this chaos (a failure to book a hotel room or intentional sabotage becomes the first verbal fight of film) only amps up tension, tension than nobody in the house can ignore. This is a pot near boiling over when Ahmed arrives. Having both men in the same household, all their respective children, and a lot of wet paint and clogged drains.

 

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